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Apostrophes trip up Kazakhstan's move away from Russian alphabet

Added: 20.01.2018 17:18 | 0 views | 0 comments


Kazakhstan's quarter-century struggle to assert its autonomy from former overlord Russia has hit an unlikely snag: the lowly apostrophe.  A vast but sparsely populated country wedged between Russia and China, Kazakhstan came under the rule of its northern neighbour as Russia and Britain jostled for control of Central Asia in the Great Game. It also came under its linguistic influence, and to this day, many Kazakhs speak more Russian than their Turkic native tongue.  This became especially concerning after Russian state media, which remain popular in Kazakhstan, helped whip up Russian-speaking separatists to fight government forces in Ukraine in 2014. In April, Kazakhstan's president of 27 years, Nursultan Nazarbayev, ordered the government to prepare a new Kazakh alphabet based on Latin characters and ditch the one based on Russia's Cyrillic script, which the Soviets implemented in 1940. He has said this will give Kazakhstan “real independence” and help it join the “information world”. But a cumbersome version of the new alphabet chosen by Mr Nazarbayev last autumn has sparked rare dissent in this authoritarian country due to its ample apostrophes. Of 32 letters in the alphabet, nine are written with an apostrophe. Mr Nazarbayev meets with Vladimir Putin in December. He has tried to gently assert Kazakhstan's independence from its former overlord Credit: Alexander Nemenov/Pool Photo via AP An “against apostrophes” hashtag soon appeared on social media. So did a “No to Kazakh Latinisation with apostrophes!” Change.org petition in October, which was briefly blocked. Film director Saken Zholdas made a video explaining how inconvenient the apostrophes were.  “With this decision, we are unintentionally, or maybe intentionally, killing the brand of Kazakh language once and for all,” he said. The problem lies in the need to differentiate related but distinct Kazakh sounds, such as a long and short “a,” or consonants similar to “s” and “sh”.  Setting them apart with an apostrophe allows the alphabet to be typed on a standard Latin keyboard, but also produces odd flurries of punctuation and many eyesore words. For instance, the word for “bottle,” pronounced “shisha,” is written “s'i's'a”, while “east,” pronounced “shyghys,” becomes “s'yg'ys”. Those are hardly the worst: The word for “skier” will be “s'an'g'ys'y” and that for “crucial” will be “s'es'u's'i”. The Republic of Kazakhstan will be written “Qazaqstan Respy’bli’kasy”. The palace of peace and reconciliation designed by Norman Foster in Astana, Kazakhstan Credit: Sergei Bobylev/TASS via Getty Images Some have speculated that Mr Nazarbayev picked the apostrophes to keep Kazakh distinct from the Latinised alphabets of other Turkic languages and placate Russia, which since Soviet times has feared pan-Turkic movements along its southern border.  “The guy just liked it, and since our country is this way, no one in government can tell the president no,” Aidos Sarym, a political analyst who previously served on a state working group on Latinisation, told The Telegraph.  Last month, Mr Nazarbayev said while the new apostrophes had caused “much discussion,” this version was the right one because it suited computer keyboards.  But at the same time it complicates web searches and social media hashtags, where an apostrophe between letters splits them into separate words.  “From a technical point of view, apostrophes create more problems than they solve,” said political analyst Dosym Satpayev. Mr Nazarbayev appears with Donald Trump in the White House on Tuesday. He has tried to balance relations with the United States, Russia and China Credit: Olivier Douliery/Pool via Bloomberg In his video, Mr Zholdas suggested replacing the apostrophes with accent marks over the nine letters in question, a move he said could be supported by 70 per cent of computer fonts. Despite the defence of his version in December, Mr Nazarbayev also said there was still time to “work with the new alphabet” before the country switches over fully in 2025, giving hope that he could eventually relax his stance. “He wants to go into history … as the father of the new Latin Kazakh alphabet,” Mr Sarym said. “You can choose any version and let it be called the Nazarbayev version, but do it right so there aren't problems now, and so that tomorrow we won't have to do an upgrade.”

Twitter Concedes Russian Influence Before U.S. Election Was Greater Than Initially Thought

Added: 20.01.2018 17:18 | 0 views | 0 comments


At least 677,774 people in the United States followed, retweeted or liked content distributed by Russian government-linked Twitter accounts in a 10-week span prior to the 2016 U.S. election, Twitter announced Friday.

From: www.yahoo.com

US government in shutdown after Senate fails to pass new budget

Added: 20.01.2018 17:18 | 0 views | 0 comments


The US government has started to shut down after Congress failed to overcome a bitter standoff over spending and immigration, marking a choatic end to Donald Trump's first year as president.  Last-minute negotiations crumbled as Senate Democrats blocked a four-week stopgap extension in a late-night vote, causing the fourth government shutdown in a quarter of a century. Social Security and most other safety net programmes are unaffected by the lapse in federal spending authority. Critical government functions will continue, with uniformed service members, health inspectors and law enforcement officers set to work without pay. But if no deal is brokered before Monday, two million federal employees will be furloughed – given leave of absence. Most staff in the departments of housing, environment, education and commerce will stay at home. Half of workers in the treasury, health, defence and transportation departments will also not be going to work next week. National parks and monuments face closure while visa and passport processing could be delayed. Essential services that protect "life or human property" will continue, including national security, postal services, air traffic control, inpatient medical services, emergency outpatient medicine, disaster assistance, prisons, taxation and electricity generation. Donald Trump's first year in office: the conflict and controversy Click here for a detailed account of what happens now. Congress scheduled an unusual Saturday session to begin considering a three-week version of the short-term spending measure - and to broadcast that they were at work as the shutdown commenced. It seemed likely each side would try forcing votes aimed at making the other party look culpable for shuttering federal agencies. White House blames Democrats After hours of closed-door meetings and phone calls, the Senate scheduled its late-night vote on a House-passed plan. It gained 50 votes to proceed to 48 against, but 60 were needed to break a Democratic filibuster.  The president watched the results from the White House residence, dialing up allies and affirming his belief that Democrats would take the blame for the shutdown, a source familiar with his conversations said.  Sen. Charles Schumer walks to the chamber after a closed meeting with fellow democrats on Capitol Hill Credit: AP The White House lashed out at Democratic Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer, blaming him for the shutdown "Senate Democrats own the Schumer Shutdown," Trump's spokeswoman Sarah Sanders declared. Senate Democrats put politics above national security, military families, vulnerable children, and our country’s ability to serve all Americans. We will not negotiate the status of unlawful immigrants while Democrats hold our lawful citizens hostage over their reckless demands.— The White House (@WhiteHouse) January 20, 2018 "Tonight, they put politics above our national security, military families, vulnerable children, and our country's ability to serve all Americans. "We will not negotiate the status of unlawful immigrants while Democrats hold our lawful citizens hostage over their reckless demands," she said. Schumer hits back Mr Schumer fought back, however, blaming the president for leading him to believe a deal was possible on a measure to prevent the expulsion of undocumented migrants who arrived in the country as children. "Every American knows the Republican Party controls White House, the Senate, the House - it is their job to keep the government open. It is their job to work with us to move forward," Mr Schumer told the Senate. "They control every ounce of the process and it is their responsibility to govern and here they have failed," he declared. FAQ | What is a federal government shutdown? The measure brought to Congress would have extended federal funding until Feb 16 and restored a health insurance programme for poor children for six years - a long-time Democratic objective. But it would have cut the Deferred Action on Childhood Arrivals programme, known as Daca, that affects Dreamers. who have been protected from deportation. White House officials insisted there was no urgency to fix Daca, which expires on March 5. Mr Trump, who had made strict measures on immigration a cornerstone of his presidential campaign, last week rejected a bipartisan proposal, saying he wanted to include any deal for Dreamers in a bigger legislative package that also boosts funding for a border wall and tighter security at the border with Mexico. The lawmakers and Mr Trump's White House had mounted last-ditch negotiations to stave off what had come to appear as the inevitable, with the parties in stare-down mode over federal spending and proposals to protect the 700,000 younger immigrants from deportation. Earlier on Friday, Mr Trump had brought Mr Schumer to the White House in hopes of cutting a deal on a short-term spending agreement. Talks collapse over immigration The two New Yorkers, who pride themselves on their negotiating abilities, started talking over cheeseburgers about a larger agreement that would have included greater military spending and money for a southern border wall. But the talks fell apart almost as abruptly as they started. In a phone call hours later, the president raised new concerns about the deal he and Schumer had discussed, according to a person familiar with the conversation. In a subsequent phone call with Schumer, chief of staff John Kelly said the deal discussed was too liberal. The White House did not immediately comment on that account. As word of the Schumer meeting spread, the White House hastened to reassure Republican congressional leaders that Trump would not make any major policy concessions, a source said. US Federal Government Shutdowns On Capitol Hill, McConnell said Americans at home would be watching to see "which senators make the patriotic decision" and which "vote to shove aside veterans, military families and vulnerable children to hold the entire country hostage... until we pass an immigration bill". "We can't keep kicking the can down the road," said Schumer, insisting on more urgency in talks on immigration. "In another month, we'll be right back here, at this moment, with the same web of problems at our feet, in no better position to solve them." Mr Schumer called on the president and leaders of both parties to resume negotiations on Saturday. Mr McConnell said he would seek a new funding bill through to February 8 but a Senate Democratic source said that was too far out. Democrats had argued for an extension of four or five days to force both sides into serious negotiations on the immigration issue. Election issue With mid-term congressional elections looming later this year, Republicans risk being blamed by voters when the government stops functioning over lack of funds. A new Washington Post/ABC poll found that 48 per cent of Americans blame Trump and the Republicans for a potential shutdown, and only 28 per cent hold Democrats responsible. Trump had been set to leave on Friday to attend a fundraiser at his Palm Beach, Florida, estate marking the anniversary of his inauguration, but delayed his travel. The shutdown is the first since 2013, when tea party Republicans - in a strategy not unlike the one Mr Schumer is employing now - sought to use a must-pass funding bill to try to force then-President Barack Obama to delay implementation of his marquee health care law. At the time, Mr Trump told Fox & Friends that the ultimate blame for a shutdown lies at the top. "I really think the pressure is on the president," he said.   2:10PM Donald Trump blames Democrats Democrats are far more concerned with Illegal Immigrants than they are with our great Military or Safety at our dangerous Southern Border. They could have easily made a deal but decided to play Shutdown politics instead. #WeNeedMoreRepublicansIn18 in order to power through mess!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 20, 2018 This is the One Year Anniversary of my Presidency and the Democrats wanted to give me a nice present. #DemocratShutdown— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 20, 2018 This is the One Year Anniversary of my Presidency and the Democrats wanted to give me a nice present. #DemocratShutdown— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 20, 2018   7:09AM The Twitter war rages The time for talking has ended. The time for tweeting has begun. Both sides are currently slugging it out on social media.  The Republicans say: Senate Democrats have let down our troops, our children, and all Americans. All of this is just unnecessary. It is reckless. Senate Democrats have brought us to a shutdown. https://t.co/RlGYYue4Hhpic.twitter.com/MVJiTZFvDt— Paul Ryan (@SpeakerRyan) January 20, 2018 The facts before us are simple. Right now, the Democratic leader has no compromise immigration bill on the table. No bill exists. Why do Americans need to suffer from a government shutdown when he doesn’t even have an immigration bill?— Leader McConnell (@SenateMajLdr) January 20, 2018  The Democrats say: Republicans control the White House, the Senate, and the House of Representatives. No matter how they spin this shutdown, we know what happened: They abandoned their responsibility.— Kirsten Gillibrand (@SenGillibrand) January 20, 2018 This will be called the #TrumpShutdown. There is no one who deserves the blame for the position we find ourselves in more than President Trump. pic.twitter.com/WE3SH9TpRU— Chuck Schumer (@SenSchumer) January 20, 2018 6:59AM The cheeseburger summit An NBC News reporter says Schumer and Trump held talks while munching on cheeseburgers.  FAQ | What is a federal government shutdown? 6:55AM What is shut down? FAQ | What is a federal government shutdown? 6:25AM McConnell to propose shorter-term funding plan Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has said he will seek to halt the shutdown with a proposal to fund the government through February 8. McConnell says February 8 is "a very reasonable time" and pushes the matter beyond President Donald Trump's Jan. 30 State of the Union address. It's unclear how quickly lawmakers might vote on McConnell's proposal. It's also uncertain if shrinking the timeframe of a short-term agreement from four weeks to three weeks will draw enough votes to reopen the government. 6:02AM Trump staying in Washington 'until this is finished' Mr Trump had already scrapped plans to depart on Friday for his Mar-a-Lago club, where he'd been set to attend a high-dollar fundraiser on Saturday night to commemorate his first year in office. While White House aides did not respond to questions about the president's weekend plans, Budget Director Mick Mulvaney told reporters he didn't expect Trump to go to Florida on Saturday. "I think the president's been very clear: He's not leaving until this is finished," he said. The reverberations of the shutdown will be felt across Washington, all over the nation - and within the White House residence. According to federal stipulations, just 21 of the 96 members of the White House residential staff would report to duty on any day of a shutdown. 5:56AM No talks on immigration until shutdown over As well as blaming the Democrats, Trump's administration said it would not discuss immigration until the government is up and running again. "When Democrats start paying our armed forces and first responders, we will reopen negotiations on immigration reform." 5:40AM Battle of the hashtags The White House is calling it the #SchumerShutdown. Nancy Pelosi, the Democratic leader in the U.S. House of Representatives, is calling it the #TrumpShutdown. “Tonight, on the eve of the first anniversary of his inauguration, President Trump earned an ‘F’ for failure in leadership," Ms Pelosi said. “I hope that we can now conduct bipartisan negotiations where we find our common ground to honor our responsibility to meet the needs of the American people.” I hope that we can now conduct bipartisan negotiations where we find our common ground to honor our responsibility to meet the needs of the American people. #TrumpShutdown Read my full statement here: https://t.co/RiGSbynFqw— Nancy Pelosi (@NancyPelosi) January 20, 2018 5:34AM Schumer responds Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer is giving his version of the talks - putting much of the blame on the president. He says he had offered to "put the border wall on the table" during discussions with Mr Trump, but that was not enough for him to make a deal.  He says an outline of a deal was in hand on immigration and spending caps but Trump "did not press his party in Congress to accept it". Sen. Schumer: "What happened to the President Trump who asked us to come up with a deal and promise that he'd take heat for it? What happened to that president? He backed off at the first sign of pressure." https://t.co/eK4NmkzQpFpic.twitter.com/Jx6zH0WaEO— CBS News (@CBSNews) January 20, 2018 5:27AM Senator McConnell reacts The Senate Majority Leader says the Democrats derailed talks with  their desire to force the passage of legislation to protect some 700,000 younger immigrants from deportation. Sen. McConnell: "Almost everybody on both sides doesn't understand how we ended up here because most of this stuff we agree on. There's only one reason we ended up here: the shoehorning of illegal immigration into this debate." https://t.co/eK4NmkzQpFpic.twitter.com/QuxoYSt8rB— CBS News (@CBSNews) January 20, 2018   5:23AM What Trump said in the past Earlier, the Democrats were keen to show what Mr Trump said when the government shutdown in 2013.  .@realDonaldTrump’s take on a government shutdown, in 2013: “I really think the pressure is on the president.” #TrumpShutdownpic.twitter.com/cP2BH31RqK— Senate Democrats (@SenateDems) January 19, 2018 5:21AM The 'behavior of obstructionist losers' The White House is continuing its attack - and you suspect Donald Trump may be dictating.  This is the behavior of obstructionist losers, not legislators. When Dems pay our armed forces & first responders we will reopen negotiations on immigration reform. During the politically manufactured #SchumerShutdown, @POTUS will fight for & protect the American people.— The White House (@WhiteHouse) January 20, 2018 5:15AM White House kicks off blame game As soon as the shutdown began, the White House tweeted it response - laying the blame squarely at the Democrats. Senate Democrats put politics above national security, military families, vulnerable children, and our country’s ability to serve all Americans. We will not negotiate the status of unlawful immigrants while Democrats hold our lawful citizens hostage over their reckless demands.— The White House (@WhiteHouse) January 20, 2018

Flu outbreak: role of simple breathing far greater in spreading virus than previously thought

Added: 20.01.2018 17:02 | 0 views | 0 comments


Flu can be spread from person to person simply via breathing, a new study has found, casting doubt on Government health adverstisements that on focus on sneezing. A groundbreaking experiment on flu patients in the US revealed the virus’s capacity to aerosolise and linger in the atmosphere is significantly greater than previously thought. By contrast, sneezing appeared to play a relatively small part in spreading influenza, which has killed at least 120 people so far this winter and has now reached epidemic levels in some areas. The results, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, call into question the relevance of some of Public Health England’s advertisements which prominently warn of the dangers of sneezing. While sneezing can transfer the virus, particularly by contaminating surfaces, people with flu sneeze relatively rarely, the researchers at the University of Maryland observed. However, the study suggested that at least four in ten flu sufferers will aerosolise - turn into droplet nuclei - the infection simply by breathing. It can then linger in the atmosphere for “hours” according to the lead scientist. The analysis of 142 flu patients found they were more likely to deposit the virus into the air around them during the early stage of their infection. It also showed that flu sufferers who were overweight or obese were more likely to aerosolise the disease. More and more of England is experiencing a flu epidemic Coughing was found to be a significant spreader of the disease. This is thought to be because obese people with flu suffer higher levels of inflammation and because their airways are prone to close up intermittently, meaning increased aerosolisation occurs when they reopen. “Influenza comes on hard and fast and you are probably infectious right then,” said Dr Donald Milton. “I would like people in my workplace who are coming down with the flu to please go home and not infect me. Dr Milton said that based on previous studies the virus lingers 'hours' in the air. “Staying home could make a real difference,” he said. Latest data from Public Health England shows that cases of flu have risen by 150 per cent in two weeks. The outbreak has reached epidemic levels in some parts of the UK with the “Japanese” strain now dominant after the NHS failed to vaccinate adults against it. Figures released on Thursday show that York is is now suffering an epidemic - meaning 109 people have the disease for every 100,000 - and that Herefordshire and north Somerset are approaching that rate. Health officials have said the current flu season is the worst for seven years. A spokesman for Public Health England said: “Scientific consensus remains that important lines of defence against flu are to avoid having unnecessary contact with other people if you or they have symptoms of flu, and to adopt good respiratory and hand hygiene – which is what the Public Health England advice says. "Our advice about what the public can do to reduce the spread of flu is underpinned by the best available evidence and directed by multiple scientific papers.”

From: www.yahoo.com

Hezbollah slams US decision to keep troops in Syria

Added: 20.01.2018 16:19 | 0 views | 0 comments


Lebanon's Hezbollah movement on Friday said a US pledge to keep its troops in Syria to defeat the Islamic State group was just a "flimsy excuse" to occupy the country. US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said Wednesday that US forces would remain in Syria to both fight IS and counter the influence of President Bashar al-Assad. Assad is a key ally of the Iranian-backed Hezbollah, which has deployed its forces to keep the Damascus regime in power.

From: www.yahoo.com

Takata Recalls 3.3 Million More Airbags

Added: 20.01.2018 16:19 | 0 views | 0 comments


Takata has expanded its already massive recall by an additional 3.3 million airbag inflators over the same concerns that they might explode and spray dangerous metal fragments into the vehicle’s ...

Tags: NFL, Airbags, GM
From: www.yahoo.com

What has happened to each of Donald Trump's campaign pledges?

Added: 20.01.2018 14:50 | 0 views | 0 comments


Donald Trump was elected on a pledge to "make America great again"  - a feat, he said, he would achieve by boosting the economy; taking a tough stance against foreign allies and cutting immigration.  On his first anniversary of entering into office, what has happened to each of President Trump's campaign promises? Build a border wall  Mr Trump insists his border wall with Mexico is still happening, but has accepted it will not all be made up of a physical barrier. While illegal border crossing arrests are at a 47-year low, Mr Trump has yet to get any money for the wall's construction signed off from Congress. We must have Security at our VERY DANGEROUS SOUTHERN BORDER, and we must have a great WALL to help protect us, and to help stop the massive inflow of drugs pouring into our country!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 16, 2018 Earlier this month it was reported that the administration had asked Congress for nearly $18 billion to fund the project.  'Massive' tax cuts Mr Trump has delivered America's biggest tax cut in 30 years, his most significant legislative win during his time in office so far.  I promised that my policies would allow companies like Apple to bring massive amounts of money back to the United States. Great to see Apple follow through as a result of TAX CUTS. Huge win for American workers and the USA! https://t.co/OwXVUyLOb1— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 17, 2018 However, claims it is the "biggest ever" have been proved wrong, according to analysis. Despite being sold as a boon for the average American, it is estimated that big corporations (whose tax rate has dropped from 35 to 21 per cent) and high earners will see the most benefit. Muslim ban  Mr Trump's promise to stop all Muslim immigration into the US was watered down even before the election. During the campaign Mr Trump called for "a total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States", but conceded the next day that the policy would not apply to all Muslims. Within their first week in office, the Trump administration suspended immigrants from seven Muslim-majority countries. After repeated legal challenges and three re-writings of the directive, a version of the ban is in place - for now. Paris climate agreement The US president kept his vow to pull out of the Paris accord, which aims to prevent global temperatures from rising by 2C above pre-industrial levels, but has hinted he may return.  France's president Emmanuel Macron (L) and US President Donald Trump shake hands before a meeting  Credit: AFP During the election campaign, Mr Trump said he would "cancel" the agreement and "stop all payments of US tax dollars to UN global warming programs". Instead, he promised to boost America's coal, oil and shale industries by lifting restrictions on drilling. But in a news conference with French president Emmanuel Macron last week, he said: "Frankly, it's an agreement that I have no problem with, but I had a problem with the agreement that they signed, because, as usual, they made a bad deal." Repeal Obamacare In 2016, Mr Trump said: "My first day in office, I'm going to ask Congress to put a bill on my desk getting rid of this disastrous law... You're going to have such great health care at a tiny fraction of the cost. It's going to be so easy." He failed spectacularly to live up to the pledge in his first six months after Republican senators voted down the repeal bill.  However, at the end of last year Mr Trump succeeded in recalling a key part of it - individual mandate, which effectively forces people to get health insurance - and has set in place a series of measures to undermine Obamacare.  $1 trillion in infrastructure  The Trump campaign's $1 trillion infrastructure plan fell by the wayside in 2017 but is thought to be next on the legislative agenda for 2018. A train derailment in Washington state which killed 3 and injured 62 last month shone a light on the issue, something Mr Trump recognised, tweeting that it showed the need for his “soon to be submitted infrastructure plan”. The train accident that just occurred in DuPont, WA shows more than ever why our soon to be submitted infrastructure plan must be approved quickly. Seven trillion dollars spent in the Middle East while our roads, bridges, tunnels, railways (and more) crumble! Not for long!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) December 18, 2017 The president has indicated he wants bipartisan support for any measures, which could prove successful given that Democrats tend to be in favour of more funding, but it is unlikely to happen before the midterm elections. Bring back waterboarding  Mr Trump campaigned on a promise to bring back the banned intelligence service practice of waterboarding on suspects, saying "I would bring back waterboarding, and I'd bring back a hell of a lot worse than waterboarding”.  He appears to have abandoned the idea, and has since commented that he had heard arguments that torture was not effective. Moving US embassy to Jerusalem Last year Mr Trump followed through on his campaign promise to to recognise Jerusalem as the Israeli-capital, upending 70 years of US policy and triggering international outrage.  However the move, which outraged Palestine and other Middle Eastern countries, means his ambition to bring peace to the region seem as far away as it ever was. Tear up 'bad' trade deals Mr Trump pulled the US out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement within days of taking office. He has yet to formally pull out of the North American Free Trade Agreement, but is aggressively renegotiating its terms, prompting others to predict the US will withdraw soon. However, despite his oft-repeated campaign threat to brand China a currency manipulator, he has yet to impose penalties on Chinese imports or take steps towards realigning their trade relationship.  Instead Mr Trump has used the threat of punishing trade relationships as leverage to get Beijing to put political pressure on North Korea. Mr Trump also promised to impose a 35 percent tariff on goods from US companies that ship production abroad - which he has not followed through with.  Destroying Isil The American-led coalition has had a string of victories against the Islamic State (Isil) including retaking vast swathes of territory. Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) marching in Raqqa, Syria Credit: AP Mr Trump has lauded the victories although critics say Barack Obama's administration laid the groundwork for the success with its strategy of working with local forces.  However the terrorist group still remains a potent force, successfully recruiting jihadists abroad, and Mr Trump has pledged to keep US troops in the region until Syria's civil war reaches a political settlement. Leave Afghanistan  During the campaign Mr Trump made a play of attacking former president George Bush's foreign wars and questioning why US troops were in the country. However, he appeared to cave to establishment pressure in August and agreed to send around 3,500 more troops to the country. “My original instinct was to pull out, and historically I like to follow my instincts,” Mr Trump said of his policy U-turn. “I heard that decisions are much different when you sit behind the desk of the Oval Office.” Iran nuclear deal Mr Trump has failed to scrap the Iran nuclear deal despite calling it the "worst deal ever". However he has started a collision course which could still bring it down. Better relations with Russia  During the campaign Mr Trump praised Vladimir Putin's leadership, suggested they could work together to end the Syrian civil war and urged warmer relations between their two nations.  Donald Trump, Vladimir Putin  Credit: AP But the cloud of the investigation into Russian meddling in the US election and the influence of senior generals has led to a more traditional stance on Russia. Moreover, Russia still remains at logger heads with the US-led allied coalition over Syria. Mr Trump has also hardened his stance on Nato, putting pressure on allies to increase their military spending.    Slap tariffs on China and Mexico Mexico was a focal point of Mr Trump's campaign and he threatened to put a 35 per cent tariff on goods made in Mexico but sold in the US. Mr Trump made similar trade threats to China but has held off a trade war with the nation in the hope that they can work on North Korea together. Stop North Korea's nuclear programme Kim Jong-Un has engaged in a war of words with Donald Trump Mr Trump has dramatically increased pressure on the regime in Pyongyang, forcing through tighter economic sanctions, particularly through the UN, and engaging in a heated war of words with its leader.  However, North Korea insists it will continue to test nuclear weapons and recently claimed it will soon have missiles capable of reaching the US mainland. It is unclear where the talks between Mr Trump and Kim Jong-Un will lead, but global watchers fear a nuclear war cannot be definitively ruled out. Cut red tape Mr Trump followed through with his promise to cut red tape, making one of his first executive orders a requirement for agencies to scrap two regulations for every new one they put in place. In December Mr Trump renewed his pledge to cut regulation, saying: "In 1960, there were approximately 20,000 pages in the Code of Federal Regulations. Today, there are over 185,000 page". To date, however, the administration says it has only cancelled or delayed 1,500 rules. Bring back jobs and boost the economy  Mr Trump centered his presidential campaign on how his business credentials would help him boost the economy.  The Dow Jones Industrial Average has increased by more than 28 per cent since Mr Trump's election, the highest since 1945 and unemployment is at its lowest level since 1973.     But critics claim the economic recovery is simply following a trend that began under the last months of the Obama administration for which Mr Trump is simply reaping the reward.  

In fight over Russia memo, Republicans have unusual ally

Added: 20.01.2018 14:34 | 0 views | 0 comments

ally. As Republicans called for the release of a classified memorandum that they say shows anti-Trump bias at the Justice Department, a network of Kremlin-controlled Twitter [TWTR.N]accounts swung into action to amplify that demand, according to specialists who monitor online activity sponsored by Moscow. The use of the hashtag #releasethememo increased 315,500 percent in roughly 24 hours on 600 Twitter accounts known or suspected to be under Kremlin influence, according to the Alliance for Securing Democracy, a project of the nonpartisan German Marshall Fund think tank.

From: www.yahoo.com

Ryan Blames Democrats For "Reckless Shutdown"

Added: 20.01.2018 14:00 | 0 views | 0 comments

Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan says the partial government shutdown is "inflicting needless uncertainty on our country" and he is blaming it all on Senate Democrats. (Jan. 20)

From: www.usatoday.com

Playoff intel: Insiders dish on stopping Gronk, containing Keenum, more

Added: 20.01.2018 13:34 | 0 views | 0 comments

NFL players, coaches and personnel give anonymous thoughts and tips on each team in Sunday's championship matchups.

Tags: NFL, Players
From: www.espn.com

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