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With $116 billion cash, Buffett says Berkshire needs 'huge' deals

Added: 25.02.2018 4:18 | 0 views | 0 comments

Warren Buffett on Saturday lamented his inability to find big companies to buy and said his goal is to make "one or more huge acquisitions" of non-insurance businesses to bolster results at his conglomerate Berkshire Hathaway Inc. In his annual letter to Berkshire shareholders, Buffett said finding things to buy at a "sensible purchase price" has become a challenge and is a major reason Berkshire is awash with $116 billion of low-yielding cash and government bonds. Buffett said a "purchasing frenzy" binge by deal-hungry chief executives employing cheap debt has made that task difficult.

From: www.yahoo.com

Winter Olympics: Kirill Kaprizov golden goal in overtime seals Olympic title for OAR

Added: 25.02.2018 4:16 | 0 views | 0 comments

It was a thrilling final in the men's ice hockey as Olympic Athletes from Russia fought back to beat Germany 4-3 with a golden from Kirill Kaprizov in overtime to clinch the men's ice hockey Olympic title in Pyeongchang.

From: www.bbc.co.uk

Winter Olympics: OAR win thrilling ice hockey final with golden goal

Added: 25.02.2018 3:11 | 0 views | 0 comments

Olympic Athletes from Russia fight back to beat Germany 4-3, settling a thrilling ice hockey final with a golden goal in overtime in Pyeongchang.

From: www.bbc.co.uk

The Latest: Russians top Germany in overtime for hockey gold

Added: 25.02.2018 2:08 | 0 views | 0 comments

A power-play goal by Kirill Kaprizov in overtime has lifted the Russians to the gold medal in men's hockey with a 4-3 win over Germany at the Pyeongchang Olympics

From: rssfeeds.usatoday.com

Cam Atkinson scored first and the Blue Jackets played loose to down the Blackhawks at home

Added: 25.02.2018 1:32 | 0 views | 0 comments

After letting loose and having fun, Cam Atkinson notched his 11th career power-play goal

Tags: Players, Goa
From: www.foxsports.com

Josh Anderson was pleased the team played for a full 60 minutes to capture a victory with his GW goal

Added: 25.02.2018 1:32 | 0 views | 0 comments

Josh Anderson scored the game-winning goal in the third period after the Columbus Blue Jackets fought for a full 60 minutes to grab the win over Chicago.

Tags: Chicago, Goa
From: www.foxsports.com

Navas not surprised by Ronaldo´s Benzema gesture

Added: 25.02.2018 1:03 | 0 views | 0 comments

Cristiano Ronaldo’s selfless gesture to allow struggling team-mate Karim Benzema to score in Real Madrid’s rout of Alaves did not come as a surprise to Keylor Navas. Ronaldo passed up the opportunity to complete his hat-trick as he let Benzema seal Madrid’s 4-0 victory over Alaves in LaLiga Saturday. Benzema had only scored three league goals […]

From: www.soccernews.com

With $116 billion cash, Buffett says Berkshire needs 'huge' deals

Added: 25.02.2018 0:35 | 0 views | 0 comments

Warren Buffett on Saturday lamented his inability to find big companies to buy and said his goal is to make "one or more huge acquisitions" of non-insurance businesses to bolster results at his conglomerate Berkshire Hathaway Inc. In his annual letter to Berkshire shareholders, Buffett said finding things to buy at a "sensible purchase price" has become a challenge and is a major reason Berkshire is awash with $116 billion of low-yielding cash and government bonds. Buffett said a "purchasing frenzy" binge by deal-hungry chief executives employing cheap debt has made that task difficult.

From: www.yahoo.com

There's an uptick in HIV in these millennial groups. Here's why

Added: 24.02.2018 23:19 | 0 views | 0 comments


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) just released a report about HIV trends for people under 30 in the U.S., and the numbers show an increase in one particular group: 25- to 29-year-olds. After collecting data from all over the country on HIV and AIDS diagnoses between 2010 and 2014, the CDC found that overall rates of infection for 13- to 29-year-olds has remained stable overall. And for some of the younger groups, like those aged 15 to 19, rates have actually gone down. But "We can't pat ourselves on the back just yet," said Craig Wilson, a professor of epidemiology and public health at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, in an interview. SEE ALSO: 3 of 4 kids who've died from flu this year weren't vaccinated, say federal doctors Wilson notes that although we're seeing an overall "flattening" in the number of HIV infections in younger demographics — which is certainly better than an increase — the results shouldn't be taken as too encouraging. "There are good things if you look at it historically, but the bad part is, why aren’t we doing better?" asked Wilson, who was not involved in the CDC report.  Although these are estimations and not exact numbers, rates increased from around 32 to 35 cases per 100,000 people in the 24- to 25-year range and from around 30 to 34 cases in the 26- to 27-year range between 2010 and 2014. (Collectively, these fall under the CDC data collection system for the 25-29 year range.) HIV — a virus that attacks and destroys cells in the body's immune system to the point that it causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome, or AIDS — has existed in the U.S. since the 1970s and was first recognized by medical experts in the early 1980s. Nearly four decades later, tens of thousands of new infections are diagnosed in the U.S. each year. Risk of infection from sex, however, can be reduced by over 90 percent if modern PrEP medications are taken as directed, says the CDC. These drugs are designed to stop HIV from establishing itself or spreading throughout the body. And, of course, a person has to know they're infected to start taking medication. What's worrisome is that the younger demographic of 13- to 29-year-olds makes up a disproportionate number of new HIV infections. The CDC says this group made up 23 percent of the U.S. population in 2014, but accounted for 40 percent of diagnoses that year.  Why aren't the infection numbers going down? The flattening trend in HIV diagnosis among younger teens and millennials isn't bad, in the sense that matters could be worse — and still could get much worse. Wilson cites CDC stats from 2016 that he called "scary"; this government report projected that half of black gay men and a quarter of Latino gay men would be diagnosed with HIV in their lifetimes.  Although there's potential for HIV diagnoses to dramatically increase in some populations, experts still find the recent flattening trend unacceptable. "The status quo isn’t so good — we need to do a better job," said Sharon Nachman, division chief of pediatric infectious diseases and professor of pediatrics at Stony Brook Medicine, who also took no part in the CDC report.  New @CDCMMWR: Study analyzing #HIV among 13-29 year-olds underscores the importance of targeting prevention efforts to persons <18 and continuing through the mid-twenties. https://t.co/jpJw3HRwtq — Dr. Anne Schuchat (@CDCDirector) February 23, 2018 A primary reason why overall rates aren't dropping, and are actually increasing in 25- to 29-year-olds, is that millennials are failing to take the first preventative steps, like getting tested. "Even though the rates may be stable, millennials are less likely to have had an HIV test, even compared to older groups," said Brandon Brown, an HIV expert at the University of California Riverside School of Medicine who played no part in the report, over email.  There could be many reasons for this, he noted, like millennials believing they're not at risk, or possibly thinking HIV is now a manageable illness.  But getting tested is critical to getting the currently "flattening" trend to begin tracking down.  Wilson said the greater goal is for 90 percent of people infected with HIV to know their diagnosis, and then for 90 percent of those who know to receive therapy for HIV — therapy that decreases transmission. "If we hit those numbers, we’ll start seeing downtrends, because HIV transmission is taking place from those not on therapy," said Wilson. Inadequate testing, however, is not just the fault of millennials. Getting people to know their status requires doctors doing a better job about talking to their patients about testing.  Nachman says doctors should ask about about HIV the same way they ask about smoking. And all doctors these days, from cardiologists to dentists, seem to ask whether you smoke. "Until we normalize HIV testing and remove testing stigma, this will continue to be a problem where many don’t know their status," said Brown. WATCH: Google is learning how to predict heart disease by looking at your eyes  

From: www.yahoo.com

Zetterberg nets milestone goal as Red Wings top Hurricanes 3-1

Added: 24.02.2018 21:53 | 0 views | 0 comments

He ties Ted Lindsay on Detroit's career list

Tags: Detroit, Goa
From: www.foxsports.com

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