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Prospective birth control pill for men has its origin in an arrow poison

Added: 17.01.2018 16:40 | 0 views | 0 comments

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Women have many options for oral contraceptives that are safe, effective and reversible, but despite decades of research, men have none. Now, scientists report a rat study that shows they finally have a good lead for a male birth control pill. It's based on ouabain, a plant extract that African warriors and hunters traditionally used as a heart-stopping poison on their arrows.

Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

Exposure to water that is both salty and fresh is key to future success

Added: 17.01.2018 13:54 | 0 views | 0 comments

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According to Charles Darwin the ability to adapt to new conditions is essential for survival of species. The capacity to cope with altered conditions is becoming increasingly important in the face of climate change. New evidence on salt water tolerance in spawning migrating pike from the Baltic Sea suggests that not being adapted to specific local environments may promote persistence in an uncertain, rapidly changing world.

Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

Scale-eating fish adopt clever parasitic methods to survive

Added: 17.01.2018 13:51 | 0 views | 0 comments


A small group of fishes -- possibly the world's cleverest carnivorous grazers -- feeds on the scales of other fish in the tropics. Biologists are trying to understand these scale-feeding fish and how this odd diet influences their body evolution and behavior.

Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

Midbrain 'start neurons' control whether we walk or run

Added: 17.01.2018 13:11 | 0 views | 0 comments

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Strolling around or running to catch the train similarly requires us to move. However, the neuronal mechanisms in the brain that allow us to initiate and control these movements are different, a new study reveals. 'Start neurons' in the midbrain are essential to take the first step to initiate locomotion and control the speed, mice models show.

Tags: EU
Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

Scientists zoom in to watch DNA code being read

Added: 17.01.2018 13:11 | 0 views | 0 comments

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Scientists have unveiled incredible images of how the DNA code is read and interpreted -- revealing new detail about one of the fundamental processes of life.

Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

Chemical evolution: Progenitors of the living world

Added: 17.01.2018 13:11 | 0 views | 0 comments

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RNA was probably the first informational molecule. Now chemists have demonstrated that alternation of wet and dry conditions could have sufficed to drive the prebiotic synthesis of the RNA nucleosides found in all domains of life.

Tags: Chemicals
Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

Coping with climate stress in Antarctica

Added: 17.01.2018 12:16 | 0 views | 0 comments

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Some Antarctic fish living in the planet's coldest waters are able to cope with the stress of rising carbon dioxide levels the ocean. They can even tolerate slightly warmer waters. But they can't deal with both climate change stressors at the same time, according to a new study.

Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

California sea lion population rebounded to new highs

Added: 17.01.2018 11:50 | 0 views | 0 comments

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California sea lions have fully rebounded under the protection of the Marine Mammal Protection Act, with their population on the West Coast reaching carrying capacity in 2008 before unusually warm ocean conditions reduced their numbers, according to the first comprehensive population assessment of the species.

Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

Why don't turtles still have tail spikes?

Added: 17.01.2018 9:23 | 0 views | 0 comments

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In a study covering 300 million years of evolutionary history, researchers have found four necessary components to tail weapon development: size, armor, herbivory and thoracic stiffness.

Tags: Cher
Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

New light on the mysterious origin of Bornean elephants

Added: 17.01.2018 8:55 | 0 views | 0 comments

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How did Borneo get its elephant? This could be just another of Rudyard Kipling's just so stories. The Bornean elephant is a subspecies of Asian Elephants that only exist in a small region of Borneo. Their presence on this southeastern Asian island has been a mystery. Scientists have discovered that elephants might have arrived on Borneo at a time of the last land bridge between the Sunda Islands in Southeast Asia.

Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

No-fishing zones help endangered penguins

Added: 16.01.2018 22:25 | 0 views | 0 comments

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Small no-fishing zones around colonies of African penguins can help this struggling species, new research shows.

Tags: Africa
Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

Confined movements: How cells form tubes in confined spaces

Added: 16.01.2018 16:20 | 0 views | 0 comments

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A team of scientists has described a novel 'microtube'-based platform to study how tubular organs, such as the heart and the kidneys, form under the various topographical restrictions commonly experienced inside the body.

Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

Named after Stanley Kubrick, a new species of frog is a 'clockwork orange' of nature

Added: 16.01.2018 16:20 | 0 views | 0 comments

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Two new frog species were discovered in the Amazon Basin. Both had been previously misidentified as another superficially identical species. One of them received a name translating to 'demon' or 'devil' in allusion to the horn-like projections visible on its eyelids. The second one was named in honor of famous American filmmaker Stanley Kubrick, because of his masterpiece A Clockwork Orange.

Tags: Honda, Amazon
Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

Great scat! Bears -- not birds -- are the chief seed dispersers in Alaska

Added: 16.01.2018 16:20 | 0 views | 0 comments

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In southeastern Alaska, brown and black bears are plentiful because of salmon. Their abundance also means they are the primary seed dispersers of berry-producing shrubs, according to a new study.

Tags: Alaska
Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

Are amoebae safe harbors for plague?

Added: 16.01.2018 14:42 | 0 views | 0 comments


Amoebae, single-celled organisms common in soil, water and grade-school science classrooms, may play a key role in the survival and spread of deadly plague bacteria. New research shows that plague bacteria, Yersinia pestis, not only survive, but thrive and replicate once ingested by an amoeba. The discovery could help scientists understand why plague outbreaks can smolder, stay dormant for years, and re-emerge with a vengeance.

Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

Memory loss from West Nile virus may be preventable

Added: 16.01.2018 14:40 | 0 views | 0 comments

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More than 10,000 people in the United States are living with memory loss and other persistent neurological problems that occur after West Nile virus infects the brain. Now, a new study in mice suggests that such ongoing neurological deficits may be due to unresolved inflammation that hinders the brain's ability to repair damaged neurons and grow new ones. When the inflammation was reduced by treatment with an arthritis drug, the animals' ability to learn and remember remained sharp after West Nile disease.

Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

New dynamic statistical model follows gene expressions over time

Added: 16.01.2018 14:04 | 0 views | 0 comments

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A new model now gives researchers a tool that extends past observing static networks at a single snapshot in time, which is hugely beneficial since network data are usually dynamic.

Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

Snapshot of DNA repair

Added: 16.01.2018 14:04 | 0 views | 0 comments

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Scientists have described the crystal structure of RNF168 bound to ubiquitin chains, a crucial interaction for DNA repair, to find a unique interaction.

Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

Cellular seismology: Putting vibrations on the map

Added: 16.01.2018 14:04 | 0 views | 0 comments

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Using a unique technology called 'cell quake elastography,' scientists can now map to the millisecond the elasticity of components vibrating inside a cell. This discovery opens up a whole new field of research in mechanobiology, opening the door to many practical applications in medicine.

Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

Circadian clocks under the microscope

Added: 16.01.2018 13:05 | 0 views | 0 comments

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Circadian clocks regulate the behavior of all living things. Scientists have now taken a closer look at the clock's anatomical structures and molecular processes in the honeybee.

Source: feeds.sciencedaily.com

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